I918 Form Update

USCIS is extending the grace period for the previous edition of Form I-918, Petition for U Nonimmigrant Status, including Supplement B, U Nonimmigrant Status Certification, through Dec. 31, 2019.

The current edition of Form I-918 available on the USCIS website is dated 04/24/19. We previously indicated that starting July 2, 2019, we would only accept the 04/24/19 edition. USCIS understands that a two-month transition period may provide a limited grace period specifically for Form I-918, Supplement B, U Nonimmigrant Status Certifications, so we have extended this grace period. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the form and instructions. Starting Jan. 1, 2020, we will only accept a Form I-918 with edition date 04/24/19.

I485 & N400 Processing

USCIS has announced their strategy to decrease differences in processing times based on location for Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, and Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status. 

Since the end of 2015, we have experienced an increase in processing times due to higher than expected volumes received during fiscal years (FY) 2016 and 2017 that did not decrease as originally projected. FY 2017 receipts were up 15.6% from FY 2016, and FY 2016 receipts were up 25.5% from FY 2015. The increased filing volumes did not affect our field offices equally, which resulted in some disparity in the processing times among field offices.

As we shift caseloads between field offices to decrease processing times, we may schedule applicants to appear for an interview at a field office outside of their normal jurisdiction. Applicants may receive an interview appointment notice or other types of notices (such as a Request for Evidence) from a field office outside of their normal jurisdiction. However, these caseload changes will not affect where applicants attend their biometrics appointments. We will still direct them to the nearest application support center. Applicants should follow the instructions on any notices they receive from USCIS.

Becoming a USC

If you meet certain requirements, you may become a U.S. citizen either at birth or after birth.

To become a citizen at birth, you must:

  • Have been born in the United States or certain territories or outlying possessions of the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction of the United States; OR  
  • had a parent or parents who were citizens at the time of your birth (if you were born abroad) and meet other requirements

To become a citizen after birth, you must:

For more information, contact ALO at 978-905-9992.

H2B Additional Cap Reached

USCIS has received enough petitions to reach the additional maximum 30,000 visas made available for returning workers under the H-2B numerical limit for fiscal year (FY) 2019.

USCIS began accepting H-2B petitions on May 8 under the temporary final rule increasing the cap by up to 30,000 additional H-2B nonimmigrant visas for returning workers through the end of FY 2019. 

USCIS will reject and return any cap-subject petitions received after June 5, together with any accompanying filing fees.

USCIS will continue to accept H-2B petitions that are exempt from the congressionally mandated cap. This includes petitions for:

Current H-2B workers in the United States petitioning to extend their stay and, if applicable, change the terms of their employment or change their employers;

Fish roe processors, fish roe technicians, and/or supervisors of fish roe processing; and

Workers performing labor or services in the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands and/or Guam from Nov. 28, 2009, until Dec. 31, 2029.

USCIS Annual Report

USCIS has released the Fiscal Year 2018 Statistical Annual Report (PDF, 4.48 MB), which provides statistical information on the most popular programs administered by the agency. The report also provides insight into the scope of USCIS’ work, which involves adjudicating millions of applications and petitions for immigration benefits annually. See the report here: https://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/statistics/2018_USCIS_Statistical_Annual_Report_Final_-_OPQ_5.28.19_EXA.pdf

Replacing Passport

Passports that have water damage can no longer be used and should be replaced.  You must apply in person to replace a damaged passport at an acceptance facility or at a passport agency. You will need the following: 

  1. The damaged U.S. passport
  2. A signed statement explaining the damage
  3. Form DS-11 (Application for U.S. passport)
  4. Citizenship evidence*  (e.g. birth or naturalization certificate)
  5. A photocopy of citizenship evidence
  6. Present ID (in person)
  7. A photocopy of ID
  8. One passport photo
  9. Fees

Children under 16 must apply in person with both parents. See Children Under 16 for more information.